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btiemann

Here's sort of the "Human Computer" way to deduce siteswap transition sequences between excited-state tricks. You map out the states, and look directly for ways to get from a state in one of the tricks to a state in the other.

14:09

3828

0

09-10-2010

[1]

Synch Transitions from Throw Sequence Method 2

08:26

2827

0

10-10-2010

[1]

10 balls 11 catches asynch fountain

btiemann

11 throws, clean finish with 10 balls in the asynch fountain. 1995.

00:05

3870

0

09-11-2009

[1]

9 balls 17 catches #1

btiemann

I tried to qualify 9 on film back in 1995, but I only got 17 catches - twice!

00:07

2637

0

09-11-2009

[1]

5 club 5-high 180

btiemann

This is the best I could do that day, it just wasn't hitting.

00:10

2547

0

09-11-2009

[1]

9 balls 17 catches #2

btiemann

The other run of 17 catches. Grrrrr!

00:07

2530

0

09-11-2009

[1]

Overview of Excited State Siteswap Transition (Mini-Series)

btiemann

Here's a non-trailer trailer for an upcoming mini-series of Boppo's Whiteboard ... namely, several different methods to calculate or deduce transition sequences between excited-state siteswap tricks. If you know the get-in and get-outs, that's enough to make transitions. If you know of or can find a trick that has states in common with the tricks you wish to transition between, that is enough to make transition sequences. If you know the states themselves and can find throws to convert between them, that too is enough. Also, if you can give the total arrival schedule, if you will, of the entire sequence you wish to have transitions within, that too enables you to deduce possible transition sequences. They all work for synch, too, but the last is maybe the best method for me.

02:55

3517

0

09-10-2010

[0]

6: 999441 siteswap

btiemann

The six-ball siteswap 999441. Note that there are 3, 2, and 1 throws of each different height, which have heights of 3^2, 2^2, and 1^1. The sum of the throws are then 3^3 + 2^3 + 1^1, which is the square of the third triangular number (1+2+3)^2. How about that? This works in general, by the way.

00:08

3152

0

10-11-2009

[0]

 
 
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