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btiemann

Here's sort of the "Human Computer" way to deduce siteswap transition sequences between excited-state tricks. You map out the states, and look directly for ways to get from a state in one of the tricks to a state in the other.

14:09

2924

0

09-10-2010

[1]

btiemann

Here's the way computers use the state-space to generate transition sequences ... and why that way doesn't work for people! Plus, there's a human-based way if you know of or can come up with a trick that has states in common with the two tricks you wish to transition between. /nPlease note that even if tricks have different levels of excitation, but nevertheless share states with one another, you can just go from the middle of one trick to the middle of the other (or wherever the tricks share the common state), without any "extra" throws.

12:38

2829

0

09-10-2010

[2]

Best Method: Throw Sequence (Brute Force) Transitions

btiemann

If you want to only watch one, watch this one. /nHere's a method to generate siteswap transitions based on where all the balls actually land; making them all work out amounts to creating a sequence. This is my favorite method, and it produces rather easily, all the possible transitions within the context of the throws that you've decided to mess with, either out of necessity (when throws collide) or by choice (when they don't). /nIf you're trying to come up with a way to write an algorithm for producing transitions, I would suggest that this way is the best way. It's deterministic, for one, and it's comprehensive, for another. /nThis is part 1... stay tuned for the thrilling conclusion!!

14:35

2543

2

09-10-2010

[3]

Best Way

btiemann

The stunning conclusion to the Throw Sequence method, for asynch tricks. In this case I derive some transitions from 714 back into 741. This one also shows how to do a 0, and why I like numbers and not letters to denote siteswap throws.

12:30

2157

0

10-10-2010

[2]

Boppo's Whiteboard:

btiemann

Here's the "Level Of Excitation" Method. To use it, you only have to know the get-in and get-out sequences for the excited-state siteswap tricks you wish to transition between. Knowing those, you can write transitions both ways.

07:33

3770

3

09-10-2010

[2]

Hybrid Tricks for Numbers Juggling: Boppo's Whiteboard

btiemann

This is a family of tricks that are part cascade or fountain, and part shower or pseudoshower, which are good tricks for learning numbers juggling. They are stepping stones between the easier tricks you can do, and target numbers trick you wish to do. Pseudoshower?! Twin to the shower, it has even high throws and odd period, instead of odd high throws and even period. The four families of hybrids are, the cascade-shower, the cascade-pseudoshower, the fountain-shower, and the fountain-pseudoshower. The inf. pseudoshower 3: 1818181 could have been added to the lower right section, on top. I like all of these tricks, but haven't seen them described this way before. I also performed 8888181 and 8888881 in Ten Years of Not Juggling, shown on the board. In that film I also performed 6: 99919191, and 5: 88171717, 6: 88881717, 7: 88888817, and also 6: 889191, and 7: 888891, which differ in having shower throws higher than the fountain throws.

09:18

5048

1

12-01-2010

[3]

Overview of Excited State Siteswap Transition (Mini-Series)

btiemann

Here's a non-trailer trailer for an upcoming mini-series of Boppo's Whiteboard ... namely, several different methods to calculate or deduce transition sequences between excited-state siteswap tricks. If you know the get-in and get-outs, that's enough to make transitions. If you know of or can find a trick that has states in common with the tricks you wish to transition between, that is enough to make transition sequences. If you know the states themselves and can find throws to convert between them, that too is enough. Also, if you can give the total arrival schedule, if you will, of the entire sequence you wish to have transitions within, that too enables you to deduce possible transition sequences. They all work for synch, too, but the last is maybe the best method for me.

02:55

2611

0

09-10-2010

[0]

Relative Heights of Siteswap Throws: Boppo's Whiteboard

btiemann

Here's a physics lesson that shows you how to calculate the relative heights of siteswap throws. How much higher is a 7 than a 6? or a 9 than a 5?

03:14

2450

1

05-01-2010

[3]

Siteswap Pinch-Ups - Boppo's Whiteboard

btiemann

Here's something I discovered while composing my thoughts for an upcoming siteswap-based tutorial for numbers juggling (still in progress) I call them "siteswap pinch-ups." I don't think they have been described before.

02:36

2775

2

01-01-2010

[2]

Synch Transitions from Throw Sequence Method 2

08:26

2154

0

10-10-2010

[1]

 
 
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