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btiemann

Here's sort of the "Human Computer" way to deduce siteswap transition sequences between excited-state tricks. You map out the states, and look directly for ways to get from a state in one of the tricks to a state in the other.

14:09

2889

0

09-10-2010

[1]

MichaelAKaras

http://www.michaelkaras.net/store.html I'm so excited to announce that a little over 5 years after its December 2004 release date, Luftgarten, my first full-length (31 minute) juggling film is available again for all of you who missed it the first time around. It's an instant $5 download and all sales go towards finishing my current project (already 40 minutes long and still going) which has two small teasers on my channel already. I'm very proud of Luftgarten and am glad to be able to offer it again, without all the hassle of shipping costs and post office trips. I hope you all take the opportunity to download it because once it goes this time, it's going into the VAULT Disney-style. Seven sections on this film and two fun surprises. Intro, Balls, Rolling, Kickups, Rings, Clubs, and "Hard Stuff". Add to that "Dance Dance Revolution" and "2 Ring Torture" and you've got yourself a Michael Karas classic. Or should I say "klassic"? Thanks again for all your support! ~Michael Karas

02:00

8890

1

20-01-2010

[7]

btiemann

Here's the way computers use the state-space to generate transition sequences ... and why that way doesn't work for people! Plus, there's a human-based way if you know of or can come up with a trick that has states in common with the two tricks you wish to transition between. /nPlease note that even if tricks have different levels of excitation, but nevertheless share states with one another, you can just go from the middle of one trick to the middle of the other (or wherever the tricks share the common state), without any "extra" throws.

12:38

2798

0

09-10-2010

[2]

Best Method: Throw Sequence (Brute Force) Transitions

btiemann

If you want to only watch one, watch this one. /nHere's a method to generate siteswap transitions based on where all the balls actually land; making them all work out amounts to creating a sequence. This is my favorite method, and it produces rather easily, all the possible transitions within the context of the throws that you've decided to mess with, either out of necessity (when throws collide) or by choice (when they don't). /nIf you're trying to come up with a way to write an algorithm for producing transitions, I would suggest that this way is the best way. It's deterministic, for one, and it's comprehensive, for another. /nThis is part 1... stay tuned for the thrilling conclusion!!

14:35

2515

2

09-10-2010

[3]

Best Way

btiemann

The stunning conclusion to the Throw Sequence method, for asynch tricks. In this case I derive some transitions from 714 back into 741. This one also shows how to do a 0, and why I like numbers and not letters to denote siteswap throws.

12:30

2123

0

10-10-2010

[2]

Boppo's Whiteboard:

btiemann

Here's the "Level Of Excitation" Method. To use it, you only have to know the get-in and get-out sequences for the excited-state siteswap tricks you wish to transition between. Knowing those, you can write transitions both ways.

07:33

3583

3

09-10-2010

[2]

Grad School 1

ultimatewannabe

I've been in grad school for 18 months now and it's been a difficult trip. Certainly more time consuming than undergrad but after the first semester I managed to find time to balance life out a bit more, resume volunteer work and circus training. The tricks in this video were mostly filmed over Thanksgiving and Christmas break and almost entirely involve backcrosses with clubs mainly because that's what I'm most excited about sharing at the moment. My knees gave me some problems several years ago and it's made me too paranoid about re-injuring them to do 360 tricks on an un-waxed floor. It's not any loss to the viewer as I haven't learned any new spin tricks in a long time. This is not to say I don't give them the effort, just that I haven't improved on them for a while. There are 360 tricks I could do in high school that I can't do much better these days despite the 6 years of practice that have passed. There are no balls in the video because I couldn't find a way to film them clearly and there is not

03:43

1408

1

22-12-2013

[1]

News from 2004 The 1st Yo Down Show Down

stringslingernm

The 10th Yo Down Show Down is around the corner. I'm excited about having the contest continue for 10 years. This is a contest/meet-up is to promote the "Art of Yo!' and encourage new players.
ydsd - yo-yo - contest - yo - down - show - down - ioio - jojo - yoyo

00:56

768

0

19-05-2014

[0]

Overview of Excited State Siteswap Transition (Mini-Series)

btiemann

Here's a non-trailer trailer for an upcoming mini-series of Boppo's Whiteboard ... namely, several different methods to calculate or deduce transition sequences between excited-state siteswap tricks. If you know the get-in and get-outs, that's enough to make transitions. If you know of or can find a trick that has states in common with the tricks you wish to transition between, that is enough to make transition sequences. If you know the states themselves and can find throws to convert between them, that too is enough. Also, if you can give the total arrival schedule, if you will, of the entire sequence you wish to have transitions within, that too enables you to deduce possible transition sequences. They all work for synch, too, but the last is maybe the best method for me.

02:55

2573

0

09-10-2010

[0]

practicing my 5 hula hoops

FRNND,DFC

I'm excited because I have a new place to train a little of what I do love my juggling!

00:55

1597

2

05-04-2011

[3]

Synch Transitions from Throw Sequence Method 1

btiemann

The first of two videos using the throw sequence method to deal with a synchronous transition, getting from (6x,4)* to (8x,2)*. Plus, a word from my sponsor.

08:12

2194

0

10-10-2010

[2]

Synch Transitions from Throw Sequence Method 2

08:26

2128

0

10-10-2010

[1]

The Origin of Aether Arts

AetherCrew

aether-arts.com This video is the origin of Aether Arts. Aether Arts is: Mark Conigliaro, Bri Maneely, Sennyo and Sir_Riel. We are excited about many things to come in the future. /nWebsite: aether-arts.com About the name, this is copied from Wikipedia -"In classical thought, the four elements Earth, Water, Air, and Fire frequently occur; sometimes including a fifth element or quintessence (after "quint" meaning "fifth") called Aether in ancient Greece."/nThank you to Ao (aoarts.com) and (zaobab.com) for also contributing!

06:29

2393

0

25-12-2010

[8]

 
 
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